The Brockley Harvest

Transition Brockley is organising a local fruit harvest. They say:

Have you got a fruit tree? Donate part of your tree's harvest for distribution to the local community (you get first share, of course).

Or volunteer to be an urban harvester (September and October) and have fun getting involved with picking, distributing and / or processing the fruit. Then come along to a harvest celebration.
Brockley has an abundance of fruit trees and a lot of fruit goes to waste because the fruit isn't picked.

As a preliminary to the fruit orchard planting in Hilly Fields Park in November, and also as an independent project, Transition Brockley is organising some local fruit harvesting in the autumn. The aim of harvesting is to benefit from our local produce, raise awareness of the fruit bounty on our doorsteps, help people harvest their fruit and redistribute the surplus amongst the community on a non-profit basis.

We will need lots of volunteers for the actual harvesting and distribution, but to start with we'd like to map what fruit trees there are in the area. Most of them are in gardens, so if you know of any, we'd love it if you could tell us the type of fruit tree (ie apple, pear, plum etc) and the address. If you know approximately when the fruit is ready for picking that would be helpful too.

If you'd like to be involved in any way, please let us know. Some of the things that need doing are:

- Mapping the trees (with details of address, cropping time, owner's contact details)
- Contacting owners of fruit trees by knocking on the door, talking to them and leaving a leaflet.
- Identifying sources of, and collecting boxes and crates for carrying fruit.
- Harvesting (tree climbers, tarpaulin holders and sorters).
- Loan of equipment e.g. fruit picker, bike trailer, large juicer / crusher
- Helping with an event to celebrate with juicing and sampling of other uses of fruits (possibly on Hilly Fields).

This is an exciting project very much in tune with Transition priorities for working as a community to reduce our carbon footprint and we hope that you will be inspired to assist in some way.

If you can help please contact: Brockleyharvest@yahoo.co.uk by the 11th September.

24 comments:

Anonymous said...

Massive pear tree on 24/26 Cranfield Road

emmajem said...

Another huge pear tree which overhangs from a back garden onto a road which i think is called Crescent Way - between Tressillian rd and crescent.

lb said...

Yeah I've seen that one.

There are some apple trees in the back gardens of Tyrwhitt Road, and a house at the bottom of Chalsey Road that has multiple apples, pears and other things. Yes, I am nosy in a pomological capacity.

Incidentally if anyone wants to make cider from these things (best thing to do with them really) you'll need some crab apples as well. Haven't seen any crabs locally, though.

Anonymous said...

We have a massive pear tree at the back of 76 Manor Avenue. It never gets harvested, if anyone wants to take some feel free to do so.

Tj (O) said...

There are apple trees in the back of houses 32, and 34 Tressillian that never get harvested - think they are ripe late September.

I've seen people picking cherries on Tressillian and in the park off Friendly street - tasted them and they were a bit sour - but great for jam.

Sara said...

what looks like a cooking apple tree at the junction of veda rd & vicars hill on the higher side of veda road.

Also, one or two houses down vicars hill from same junction, on the left if one is walking up hill, one or more of the houses has 3 huuuugely laden pear trees, I can see them from my back garden, but its hard to work out which houses exactly they belong to.

Headhunter said...

There's a cherry tree overhanging our garden but it's quite hard to get to the fruit as it's so high up and there's stuff in the way...

dogging prince said...

i saw a massive pair on the top of hilly fields last night

Anonymous said...

good idea. otherwise the rotting fruit will attract wasps nests.

but I can't help thinking - aren't there real social problems to be dealing with rather than who is going to fill what crate of apples?

David said...

They're going to need to do this before mid Sept this year. I have two apple trees in my back garden & by the looks of things all the fruit will be ripe in the next couple of weeks. My pear tree seems to be dying though unfortunately.

Robert. said...

Regarding the massive social problems, quoted by anon.

Any suggestions as to how we might confront these? We don't have millions of pounds to spare, not keen on vigilantism, and political power is something communities like ours struggle for.

Robert said...

I think this is a great initiative. My cronies and I discussed such a thing in the pub last year - but only got so far as making a few bottles of cider from our own garden fruits.

We have a number of fruit trees at the bottom of the garden - though some are overhanging from our neighbours and they have been significantly pruned this year - so our harvest may not be so impressive.

We always make half a dozen or so bottles of Elderflower cordial when the flowers are in season too. Brockley's harvest is bountiful!

Headhunter said...

Yes there are other social issues that need addressing but what are you suggesting? That all other life in SE London goes on hold whilst every resource we have is focused on "social issues". Other people's lives continue outside the realm of crime and youth problems....

Brockley Nick said...

Totally agree HH.

Hugh said...

Conservation Area Cider 4 Betta Lives 4 Kidz?

Anonymous said...

Doggers for justice.

Pete said...

I agree that they may need to bring this forward as the apples on our tree on Algiers Road are very nearly ripe already.

I would love someone to tell me which variety they are too.

Anonymous said...

Elderberry Wine is good too.

Danja said...

That has to be an early variety Pete - do they look like this (Discovery, the most common early cropper)?

http://tinyurl.com/3yg4xzx

Pete said...

Yes they do look a bit like that. You can come round and get some in a couple of weeks time if you like Danja.

Pete said...

Although ours aren't red in the middle like the ones in the photo so on reflection I'm not so sure.

Danja said...

They aren't usually like that - typically more like this inside:
http://www.tracingpaper.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/discovery-apples.jpg

You know how to test when they are ready?

Pete said...

No not really. Eat them is my usual practice; is there a more scientific approach?

Danja said...

That kind of works, but they do not all ripen at the same time so it's a bit cart before horse. And, many apples need to ripen in store off the tree (not likely with early ones).

If you cup the apple and rotate your hand in an upwards arc, if it's ripe the stalk will just part smoothly from the branch without any fuss. If you get to 90 degrees and it hasn't come off, it isn't ready.

Yes, I sit here chewing a barley stalk. Now, where are those pressing social problems - I feel guilty.

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